Skip to main content

For a Twist on the Classic Bacon, Egg, and Cheese: “Olmsted”



If you are a New Yorker there are two things you need in order to have a successful morning: a proper cup of coffee and a bacon, egg, and cheese sandwich (BEC). The pair go together better than peanut butter and jelly. Especially since I am not a fan of the latter. 

When I think about some of the best BEC sandwiches I have ever had they all have one thing in common - the way they were prepared. They were either on a roll or bagel but the way they were presented and tasted where essentially the same. 

But last year, right in time for my annual to do list (https://bit.ly/2JSFq4u), I read an article in Conde Nast Traveler that peaked my interest. It was featured in their March 2018 issue and the article I read was entitled “32 Best Restaurants in New York City”. 

On the list was a classic Brooklyn spot where I have spend a meal or two; “Roberta’s” (https://bit.ly/2RUOGYZ). There was also a spot that will likely appear on the my next annual to do list when it posts next month; “Barbuto”. As per the Cooking Channel’s “The Best Thing I Ever Ate” this spot got my attention for their spaghetti carbonara when it was featured recently on this television show.

But we are not here to talk about the past or the future. This is about an item I gladly crossed off this year’s to do list; “Olmsted”.

“Olmsted” opened for dinner in May 2016 and began serving brunch in March 2018. And that is why I was there. More specifically I had heard about their bacon, egg, and cheese egg rolls, and I hadn’t been able to think about much else since.  



Named for Frederick Law Olmsted, famed for his creation of New York City’s Central Park and Prospect Park coincidentally located nearby, his firm is also behind some of the great manors I have visited such as: “Cairnwood Estate” in Bryn Athyn, Pennsylvania (https://bit.ly/2SxZBZT) and Doris Duke’s “Rough Point” in Newport, Rhode Island (https://bit.ly/2WWLETI).  

“Olmsted” is a farm to table restaurant that seeks to procure fresh and seasonal produce for those seeking not to spend a fortune for a quality meal. 

The restaurant decor plays with the balance between indoor and outdoor using something they call a “living wall” which is basically a large live plant form of wallpaper. 

When we sat down, my party of three, was instructed by our waitress that the plates were made to be shared so that we should pick two or three dishes to start with.




Obviously the first one was a no brainer: egg rolls filled with smokey bacon, farm fresh eggs, and Vermont cheddar served with green ketchup, along with Austrian donuts filled with jelly, a potato latke served with lemon creme fraiche, as well as spinach borëk potatoes made with eggs and Feta cheese. 

Can you tell we were hungry?

Those egg rolls were better than you can even imagine. They were delicate and the bacon was diced so fine you only noticed it was present because of the hint of smokey flavor you tasted. My God I would go back just to have two orders of these all to myself.


The donuts got attacked next and they were my second favorite part of this meal. They were light, fluffy, and the jelly was a sweet raspberry.  


The potato latke was a one giant serving and was delicious. I mean how do you mess up a potato latke? It is one of the greatest foods on this planet.



Lastly I reached for a forkful of the spinach borek potato which a kind of spinach pie. It was tasty but I was full by this point as were my companions so this got the least amount of attention. We all were, however, still talking about the now long gone egg rolls. I am telling you they are something. 

Please note: Brunch is only served on Friday - Sunday and I highly recommend making a reservation as this restaurant’s fifty seat capacity fills up fast, for good reasons.

For More Information:





Comments

Popular posts from this blog

For Find Out Friday - Why Do Emery Boards Make My Skin Crawl?

You know that sound a fingernail makes when it scratches against a chalkboard?  You know that feeling the sound of that action gives you? I, like most people, hate that sound.  I instantly feel like scrunching my shoulders up to my neck and closing my eyes.  I feel the exact same way when I am using an emery board to file my nails. This annoying sensation has a name: “grima” which is Spanish for disgust or uneasiness. This term basically describes any feeling of being displeased, annoyed, or dissatisfied someone or something.  It is a feeling that psychologists are starting to pay more attention to as it relates to our other emotions.  Emery boards are traditionally made with cardboard that has small grains of sand adhered to them. It is the sandpaper that I believe makes me filled with grima.  According to studies that are being done around the world, it is not just the feeling that we associate with certain things like nails on a chalkboard or by using emery boards

For the Perfect Appetizer Dinner: “Morgan’s Brooklyn Barbecue”

Have you ever gone out to eat and wished that you just ordered a bunch of appetizers?  I have.  It is actually my preferred way to eat. I like to get a taste of a bunch of different things rather than one big plate. I am much more interested in the kinds of foods we eat as appetizers versus lunch or dinner. Desserts hardly ever register on my radar. At the beginning of this year, right before I was set to release my annual to do list , I stumbled upon a photo of the most beautiful plate of brisket nachos I have ever seen. I instantly wanted them. Naturally the establishment behind said nachos, Morgans Brooklyn Barbecue, earned a spot on my list. The week leading up to my visit all I could think about was “would those nachos be my entire meal or just my appetizer”? Sure I love all kinds of barbecue food: the ribs, the brisket, pulled pork, and don’t even get me started on those sides!! Any restaurant that serves mac and cheese, corn bread, and creamed spinach us

For Find Out Friday - How Do You Milk An Almond?

Despite my affinity for cheese and other dairy products, occasionally (actually a few times a week) I like to go dairy-free.  During those times I rely heavily on my favorite brand of almond milk, as seen in the picture above.  Though I know there is no dairy in this product, I constantly wonder: “how does one milk an almond”? Logically I am aware that no actually “milking” is taking place.  I also know that almond milk can be made at home, although I have zero interest in attempting to make it despite my love of spending time in my kitchen. So, what is the actual process?  How long does it take?  When / where / who was the first to successful develop this product? When talking about this kind of “milk” what we are really talking about is plant juices that resemble and can be used in the same ways as dairy milk. Plant like juice has been described as milk since about 1200 A.D. The first mentions can be found in a Baghdadi cookbook in the thirteenth