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For My Most Anticipated Meal in Sleepy Hollow: “Horsefeathers”


The only other meal I had in town was at J.P. Doyle’s (http://bit.ly/2zx0rcm) and that was to die for. Since that meal I had been looking forward to my next one in town. I had read and heard that Horsefeathers was the best place to grab a bite in all of Sleepy Hollow. Even my cousins who ended up meeting me there had heard nothing but rave reviews. My mouth had been watering all day knowing this is where it would end. 

As I reported via a Find Out Friday back in June (http://bit.ly/2mbf3Ly) I believe I have a beef related food sensitivity that many people have but have not heard of. So having a cheeseburger is a rare treat for me. I save that order for the few occasions a year I actually crave one. So my meal at Horsefeathers had been predetermined. 










Walking in I was so hungry I thought I was going to pass out. This is the day I went to Sunnyside (http://bit.ly/2ymFH62) and Kykuit (http://bit.ly/2m9KTs9). It had been a long day, a great day, but a long day and I just wanted to sit down and recuperate before my drive home. 


There was no way I could wait for my entree to start eating. I didn't even wait for the rest of my party to show up. I began right away with an iced tea, the spinach dip and chips for an appetizer, as well as a Lindemens raspberry ale for good measure.  


I had a hankering for a cheeseburger since that dinner at J.P. Doyle’s so I knew that was what I was going to eat at Horsefeathers. There were so many kinds to choose from but I ended up going with a burger with sautéed fresh mushrooms and onions along with some blue cheese for fun. 




Horsefeathers has been opened since 1981 (a good year since it happens to be the one I was born in) and has over one hundred menu items to choose from. Many, many things sounded delicious. I wonder if I would have been happier with another choice. 

The appetizer was good, creamier than you would get at Applebee’s or T.G.I.F.’s which is due to their three cheese blend. I enjoyed it immensely. 

When my entree arrived I was super excited. 


As I took my first bite I was already disappointed before I swallowed. While I had asked for it to be well done it was too well done. The burger seemed dry and void of flavor. It was a bit too thick and big for me. I had envisioned something completely different. My burger dreams died that night. 

I picked on it and then was so full I was over it. 

I was looking around seeing what everyone else was getting to see if I chose wrong. All I saw was a bunch of appetizers and many things served in baskets. I don't know what that means either. 




If you Google best burgers in Sleepy Hollow, Horsefeathers is sure to be listed in the top ten. I believe their chowders and wings are supposed to be good too but I don't know. I just know that the burger I ordered and ate wasn't the one I was craving. 

Perhaps if my 2018 to do list returns me to this town I will give Horsefeathers another shot. With so much food to offer I suspect something is bound to send me into a favorable food coma. 


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