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For the keys to my New York City Part IV






The Best Thing I Ever Ate

I am obsessed with this show!!

Here are the places in NYC that I have tried so far:

  • A Salt and Battery- I went for the deep fried candy bar and stayed for the fish and chips. This place is fantastic!! Authentic British cuisine in an unassuming place but the quality cannot be beat. (http://www.asaltandbattery.com/)

  • Tea and Sympathy- This is next door to A Salt and Battery. I tried the recommended Victoria Sandwich cake and it was such a treat.  It is light and fluffy with layers of jam and cream in the middle. What’s not to like?! (http://www.teaandsympathynewyork.com/home.php)


  • Kees Chocolates- I went for the Crème Brulee chocolates I saw on the show but they were sold out. Apparently you have to call ahead for that particular candy. I am not kidding. That aside, I recommend the pistachio and almond butter crèmes because they melt in your mouth. For chocolate lovers there is a variety of filings to choose from, from the basics to the exotic. (http://www.keeschocolates)


Tomorrow My Keys to NYC series wraps up with a 2011 to do list!!!

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