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For the Variety That is “Vinnie’s Pizza”






 
There is nothing better than the intoxicating smell when you step inside a pizzeria. That smell reminds me of my childhood and instantly has me drooling for a piping hot slice of the cheesy goodness. If I could bottle that smell I would wear it as perfume. It makes me that happy, and well hungry.

My home turf of Brooklyn is home to some of the best pizzerias in New York City. Considering there is one every few blocks it makes them the Starbucks of my neighborhood. As a good Brooklynite I try to support as many local spots as I can. This weekend I ventured out slightly further towards to my new favorite spot in Williamsburg, Vinnie’s Pizza.

Last summer on Instagram I noticed pictures of all of these amazing slices of pizza which brought my attention to Vinnie’s. Upon further digging I learned that this was a place where you can literally order the pizza of your dreams. I love Brooklyn as much as the next guy but it can be a place with limited food choices depending on what area you live in. Sadly sometimes even trying for a fresh mozzarella pie can be changeling. Never mind if you were craving something more exotic like feta cheese.









But at Vinnie’s all of you dreams can come true. You can have a slices with any of these mind-blowing toppings: avocado, hummus, pico de gallo, sweet and sour short ribs which are only a handful of the choices at your disposal. Sure they have all of the usual toppings like mushrooms, pepperoni, spinach, and extra cheese but those need at least one unique topping I think. They have plain slices too but I cannot even think of a reason for eating one. I am sure they are good but seriously if that is all that you wanted you can get it from any other location. I think Vinnie’s is more of a “go big or go home” pizza destination.

As for my choices I went with what was already there. That meant I tried a slice of caprese, macaroni (with cheese, bacon, and sour cream), feta cheese (with spinach and tomatoes), and buffalo chicken (with blue cheese).

I started eating a piece of each with a knife and fork and then gradually tearing at it into pieces to satisfy my urges. I was alternating slices with no plan just whatever I could grab at first. Although the toppings made this an odd mix of flavors it was still beyond delicious.



I think my favorite would have to be the macaroni and cheese. The sour cream drizzle was just the right amount and the bacon was cooked fully and cut up into small pieces adding texture and flavor without overpowering the cheddar cheese sauce. It was wonderful. My second favorite would have to be the spinach feta cheese slice. They also had one with chicken but without it, it was more like a salad slice but better. The feta gave it a little kick to made your mouth aware that it was tasting something out of the ordinary.


Tied for second place is the caprese. While this isn’t necessarily original its celebrity quality is the marinara sauce. That sauce was so good I was taken back. Sauce, tomato, and fresh mozzarella and all I tasted was something that should have its picture in a frame. I love a good surprise and that piece sure delivered.


Unfortunately that leaves the buffalo chicken coming in last. The actual chicken itself was a little dry but the slice was still pretty good. I think I could have eaten just that slice without the chicken, with blue cheese and buffalo sauce drizzled on it.












Aside from the food I loved the actual place. It is began in 1960 but the shop had many memorabilia hanging from the 1980s that reminded me of my childhood. It was small inside but incredibly well kept. The guys working there were very helpful and nice to boot. I couldn’t believe the place was empty when I arrived and pretty much stayed that way for the hour I was there. I loved the old school feel with the upgraded paper towels on each table instead of those thins ones you continue to pull out like you’re a clown with handkerchiefs. Lastly I have to comment on the free water that was provided. It may sound insane but I have had hard times at fancy receptions where water was as hard to come by, as it would be in a desert. Here all of my needs, wants, and dreams come true.


To say I will be going back to Vinnie’s some day soon is an understatement. I already know I will be calling ahead to pre order a Black Bean Avocado Tomato Feta pie. I just read about it and thus its creation must be mine. Believe me if they weren’t too far for delivery that pie would be at my front door right now. There were too many choices for me to even think of what would go best together so one already suggested works for me especially since these are some of my very favorite things to eat let alone combined and on a pizza!

As you can see from the list below, pizza should be my middle name. I try to remain loyal to those I love all the while trying to stay on top of the most popular places for the sake of those reading my blog.

The next and last Brooklyn pizzeria from my 2015/2016 to do list is Artichoke Pizza. You will be reading about that shortly.

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