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For Enjoying a Beautiful Birthday Dinner at “Breakwater”


Alas we arrive at my final activity in Connecticut, a sunset dinner at Breakwater Restaurant. This was probably my favorite part of the day as well although it is a tough choice.



Before I even write this I am already craving this meal more than that milkshake of my dreams from this afternoon.  But I may as well tear off the Band-Aid and get right down to business.

For starters we need to talk about the view. And what a view it was! It was actually the first video I posted on my Snapchat. There was a marvelous pink sky as the sun was setting. There were others eating outside like we were but the noise level was perfect. Actually everything was perfect, like I was in a movie perfect. I took as many pictures as I could but that beauty along with our celebration created a perfect storm of happiness. Keep in mind I only had one drink.  Yes that Champagne and peach beverage was perfect too.







For an appetizer my table shared fried calamari that was served with spicy marinara and a Thai chili sauce. This was remarkably good. The sauces were different but delicious. Sometimes you only need to keep a staple food item while using specialized condiments to make it stand out. This dish was very quickly devoured.









For my entrée I had my standard meal when I am in these parts- fried shrimp with French fries. Here it was seasoned with house made tartar sauce and malt vinegar aioli. I have no idea what that is but it certainly made my food extra tasty.

I am not a huge fish person but when in Rome….I just have to. I know the seafood is fresh, prepared correctly, and likely delectable. I never have to worry or second-guess my order. That takes all of the stress out of the meal. There is only one other restaurant in Connecticut where I ate fried shrimp that was as good as it was at Breakwater. That restaurant was “Go Fish” (http://bit.ly/2auQuTV) in Mystic, which is not too far from Breakwater.

Other foodie orders included the baked claims, a Portobello mushroom burger (a special that night), and the grilled jumbo shrimp scampi served with “crispy smashed fingerling potatoes”.

There were no complaints, actually hardly any words spoken until we were done eating. But what is a birthday celebration without dessert? We shared a chocolate flourless cake and the bread pudding.  I always have room for bread pudding, this being good even though I have to say New Orleans has this recipe beat.

This night was all about staring out onto the gorgeous water as we watched the sun set with the only sound I heard was me chewing my food. I could have stayed in that trance forever.

I sure packed a lot into my one day away and there is still so much more I want to do. Connecticut will always be a Pandora’s Box a plenty for me. I love knowing I will be continuing to visit all parts of this state, which as their slogan states, “is still revolutionary”.

If you are looking for a great restaurant in this area or better yet a place to celebrate that you’re “Thirty Five and Still Alive”..…this is the perfect place to do it.

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