Skip to main content

Find Out Friday - Why Does Boston Celebrate Patriots’ Day?


I am a HUGE fan of the Wahlberg family and their burgers. I have visited two of their locations. Once when they were in Brooklyn (https://bit.ly/2KDp5NY) but first I had made a pilgrimage to where it all started; Boston (https://bit.ly/2jxNQyC). 

I have a great affinity for the city of Boston (https://bit.ly/2JUmk9s) and even only having been there once, I have great ambitions for my follow up trips. 

All of this being so, I was inclined to watch the movie, Patriots’ Day, that tells the story of the 2013 bombing of the Boston Marathon. It happens to star Mark Wahlberg and of course takes place in the city of Boston. It was an incredibly well done movie with an amazingly shocking story. 

But what question came across my mind during the movie (besides all of the obvious ones about the state of humanity), was: What is the meaning of Patriots’ Day? And why does Boston celebrate it with an annual marathon?

Patriots’ Day is a holiday only celebrated by three states: Massachusetts, Wisconsin, and now Connecticut (as of this year). Florida doesn’t officially celebrate it but strongly encourages residents to acknowledge the significance of the day. 

Patriots’ Day has been a holiday, in Massachusetts, since the end of Revolutionary War. It is the meaning behind it after all. 

Patriots’ Day officially commemorates the Battles of Concord and Lexington, which marked the beginning of the War back in 1775. Today in those towns bells are rung to symbolize the moments when they realized the British troops were approaching. 

This holiday is not to be confused with “Patriot’s Day” which is to honor the horrors of another war and the events of September 11, 2001.

The Boston Marathon didn’t become apart of Massachusetts Patriots’ Day celebration until the late 1890s. Prior to that, the day was commemorated by fasting and prayer. 

But with the dawning of the Olympics in Athens in 1896, foot races proclaiming victory, brought new meaning to the sport. Thus in 1897 the Boston Marathon became an annual tradition to commemorate the hard fought battle for our freedom. 

The original path was intended to trace the route of those battles from Concord to  Lexington as the soldiers did. However, the route proved to be less than twenty miles. In an effort to create a true marathon the route now begins on the tracks of Boston and Albany about twenty-five miles to the northwest of the battles origins near Ashland, Massachusetts. 

Supporters of this long standing tradition greatly believe the race perfectly celebrates America’s marathon towards freedom itself.

It an ironically sad twist, the 2013 Boston Marathon began with a moment of silence. It was to honor those who lost their lives in the school shooting in Newtown, Connecticut the previous December. The twenty-six mile marker (indicating the final mile of the race) was dedicated to another school shooting, Sandy Hook. 

To now acknowledge that there was yet another tragedy during the first few moments of the 2013 marathon seems unimaginable. What it says about our country frightens me all the more.

But I prefer to end on a more positive note. 

During this year’s Boston Marathon, which occurred on April 16, there was a milestone in the women’s division.

This year, Desiree Linden, became the first American woman to win the Boston Marathon! She finished strong, completing the race in: two hours, thirty-nine minutes, and fifty-four seconds. She is the first American woman to do so since 1985. 

Talk about girl power.

For More Information:







Comments

Popular posts from this blog

For Find Out Friday - Why Do Emery Boards Make My Skin Crawl?

You know that sound a fingernail makes when it scratches against a chalkboard?  You know that feeling the sound of that action gives you? I, like most people, hate that sound.  I instantly feel like scrunching my shoulders up to my neck and closing my eyes.  I feel the exact same way when I am using an emery board to file my nails. This annoying sensation has a name: “grima” which is Spanish for disgust or uneasiness. This term basically describes any feeling of being displeased, annoyed, or dissatisfied someone or something.  It is a feeling that psychologists are starting to pay more attention to as it relates to our other emotions.  Emery boards are traditionally made with cardboard that has small grains of sand adhered to them. It is the sandpaper that I believe makes me filled with grima.  According to studies that are being done around the world, it is not just the feeling that we associate with certain things like nails on a chalkboard or by using emery boards

For the Perfect Appetizer Dinner: “Morgan’s Brooklyn Barbecue”

Have you ever gone out to eat and wished that you just ordered a bunch of appetizers?  I have.  It is actually my preferred way to eat. I like to get a taste of a bunch of different things rather than one big plate. I am much more interested in the kinds of foods we eat as appetizers versus lunch or dinner. Desserts hardly ever register on my radar. At the beginning of this year, right before I was set to release my annual to do list , I stumbled upon a photo of the most beautiful plate of brisket nachos I have ever seen. I instantly wanted them. Naturally the establishment behind said nachos, Morgans Brooklyn Barbecue, earned a spot on my list. The week leading up to my visit all I could think about was “would those nachos be my entire meal or just my appetizer”? Sure I love all kinds of barbecue food: the ribs, the brisket, pulled pork, and don’t even get me started on those sides!! Any restaurant that serves mac and cheese, corn bread, and creamed spinach us

For Find Out Friday - How Do You Milk An Almond?

Despite my affinity for cheese and other dairy products, occasionally (actually a few times a week) I like to go dairy-free.  During those times I rely heavily on my favorite brand of almond milk, as seen in the picture above.  Though I know there is no dairy in this product, I constantly wonder: “how does one milk an almond”? Logically I am aware that no actually “milking” is taking place.  I also know that almond milk can be made at home, although I have zero interest in attempting to make it despite my love of spending time in my kitchen. So, what is the actual process?  How long does it take?  When / where / who was the first to successful develop this product? When talking about this kind of “milk” what we are really talking about is plant juices that resemble and can be used in the same ways as dairy milk. Plant like juice has been described as milk since about 1200 A.D. The first mentions can be found in a Baghdadi cookbook in the thirteenth