Skip to main content

For Ferrara’s Pastry








I love lobster tails, both kinds. The seafood version is to die for with melted butter and the best can be found at Scoma’s in San Francisco. However, when we are talking about the best pastry version, luckily that answer is a lot closer to home for me. Ferrara Bakery and Cafe in Little Italy New York City is where I want to live out my final days. 

For those who may have never heard of lobster tail as a dessert, let me tell you what you have been missing. Lobster tails are Italian pastries that have a hard, crunchy shell (sort of in the shape of you guessed it- a lobster tail) that is filled to the brim with French Vanilla custard.  Rarely it may have a cannoli filling but those aren’t as good. Powered sugar goes on top for fun. The combination of the crunch and semi-sweet filling is over the top. Since I am not really into sweets, the texture adds to the appeal. It is my all time favorite kind of dessert. Every year if I am home for my birthday it is what I have for breakfast. It is the best way to start a special day. For that matter, it is also a way to make any day special.

So naturally when I was watching The Best Thing I Ever Ate: Last Supper, and lobster tails were mentioned you can imagine how excited I was. Chef Alex Guarnaschelli said the lobster tail at Ferrara Bakery and Café was the best thing she ever ate; I knew I had to check it out. 






When I finally got there, I ordered the iced cappuccino with my lobster tail. That was the perfect drink to wash down my treat. As for the lobster tail itself; it arrived on a beautifully decorated dish. I was so excited I could barely sit still. I closed my eyes and took my first bite. I was in heaven! But this lobster tail was a little different than I pictured it. The crusty exterior was traditional but the filling was thicker than I expected. It was like a combination of the two types of filling. But it was extraordinarily good. Now I know why they were featured as the perfect last supper.

As a general rule, we should do whatever Chef Alex Guarnaschelli says, especially when its advice like this: put coffee in one hand and lobster tail in the other, taking turns biting each until you are done. It might the smartest and tastiest thing I ever heard. I definitely used this system during my visit.

Now for those who want to try additional treats, this place has all kinds of goodies.








There is plenty of seating, actually two floors of seating so it is very unlikely you will have to wait. If you are hungry for food first, they also have several lunch sandwiches that were very delicious. Apparently when ordering here you cannot make a wrong choice.

After eating my heart out, I went outside to take some photos. There was a classic 1960’s car parked on the street playing Bobby Darin’s Beyond the Sea.  The atmosphere made me feel like I was in a movie. The sights, smells, and foods on that block are worth a trip. 

For further information:

Comments

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

For Find Out Friday - Why Do Emery Boards Make My Skin Crawl?

You know that sound a fingernail makes when it scratches against a chalkboard?  You know that feeling the sound of that action gives you? I, like most people, hate that sound.  I instantly feel like scrunching my shoulders up to my neck and closing my eyes.  I feel the exact same way when I am using an emery board to file my nails. This annoying sensation has a name: “grima” which is Spanish for disgust or uneasiness. This term basically describes any feeling of being displeased, annoyed, or dissatisfied someone or something.  It is a feeling that psychologists are starting to pay more attention to as it relates to our other emotions.  Emery boards are traditionally made with cardboard that has small grains of sand adhered to them. It is the sandpaper that I believe makes me filled with grima.  According to studies that are being done around the world, it is not just the feeling that we associate with certain things like nails on a chalkboard or by using emery boards

For the Perfect Appetizer Dinner: “Morgan’s Brooklyn Barbecue”

Have you ever gone out to eat and wished that you just ordered a bunch of appetizers?  I have.  It is actually my preferred way to eat. I like to get a taste of a bunch of different things rather than one big plate. I am much more interested in the kinds of foods we eat as appetizers versus lunch or dinner. Desserts hardly ever register on my radar. At the beginning of this year, right before I was set to release my annual to do list , I stumbled upon a photo of the most beautiful plate of brisket nachos I have ever seen. I instantly wanted them. Naturally the establishment behind said nachos, Morgans Brooklyn Barbecue, earned a spot on my list. The week leading up to my visit all I could think about was “would those nachos be my entire meal or just my appetizer”? Sure I love all kinds of barbecue food: the ribs, the brisket, pulled pork, and don’t even get me started on those sides!! Any restaurant that serves mac and cheese, corn bread, and creamed spinach us

For Find Out Friday - How Do You Milk An Almond?

Despite my affinity for cheese and other dairy products, occasionally (actually a few times a week) I like to go dairy-free.  During those times I rely heavily on my favorite brand of almond milk, as seen in the picture above.  Though I know there is no dairy in this product, I constantly wonder: “how does one milk an almond”? Logically I am aware that no actually “milking” is taking place.  I also know that almond milk can be made at home, although I have zero interest in attempting to make it despite my love of spending time in my kitchen. So, what is the actual process?  How long does it take?  When / where / who was the first to successful develop this product? When talking about this kind of “milk” what we are really talking about is plant juices that resemble and can be used in the same ways as dairy milk. Plant like juice has been described as milk since about 1200 A.D. The first mentions can be found in a Baghdadi cookbook in the thirteenth