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For Year 9: 2019/2020 To Do List



There is always something to blog about. 

No matter where I am, what I have time for, or whether it has been planned ahead of time or not; I always find something I want to do, see, or eat. 

What follows shortly after my visit, is a blog post telling you why you should or shouldn’t do the same. 

I hope that my blogs educate, inspire, and excite my readers just as the act of completing items off my annual to do list does for me. 

I guess what I am really talking about is passion. I am passionate about everything I have included on this list, just as I was on all of the lists that came before, and the ones that will follow. 

As I continue on my journey as a blogger and seeker of new experiences, I have surely modified my ways. 

This year’s to do list includes both activities and restaurants that express where my current interests lay.



For instance, since the introduction last year of #pizzafriday I am now on a quest to find, and more importantly taste, pizzas of quality and creativity. 

I am also becoming increasingly obsessed with historic places, houses to be specific. This is true within my own neighborhood as every day it seems to bring about a new place of significance I can drive by whenever I please. 

Both of these interests bring me immense joy and a strong sense of intrigue. This year’s list will surely explore these interests to the fullest.

Re-evaluating my list each year allows me to strip out what no longer seems to matter to me (a very small portion) and laser focus on what needs to be a priority. I make it a point to show what portion of my prior list remains undone, but not because I am no longer interested. Rather to demonstrate how fast time flies when you are having fun. It is a distinction that matters to me in terms of planning. 

I have noticed that from last year more items were checked off from the food portion of my annual list than activities. There is no real explanation other than what I had time for. 

Though I rely HEAVILY on this list all year long, I despise writing it. Each year I post it later and later, although this year I am ahead of my May posting last year. I think it is because of the research I insist I do in order to compile information that will truly be an asset to me and those who want to tag along. 

You would think once it is done I could relax. But you’d be surprised how fast I begin collecting data for a list a year a way. Surely it is a labor of love, but a labor nonetheless. 

As I review the previous lists I get excited when I can cross something off. This is not because it is done but rather because without this list I know I would have missed out on so many great things. Besides just getting to experience something original, special, historical, or delicious, it has brought together my loved ones who want to take part in these journey with me. This list has been the catalyst for memories I will cherish for the rest of my life.

What is even more exciting than the places listed here are the ones I am not even aware of yet. There are the ones that I will stumble upon as I do research for a blog post or find out via a suggestion from my trusted inner circle.

Knowing that my future is filled with adventure, whether planned or not, illuminates why I love my job.




2019/2020 To Do List; Food
Remaining From Prior Year
Borough
Restaurant
Location
Reason
Manhattan
          Amy Ruth’s
113 West 116th Street
Chicken and waffles

S’Mac
157 East 33rd Street Between Lexington & 3rd Avenues
Mac n’ Cheese

Lafayette
380 Lafayette Street
French cuisine

Murray’s Cheese and nearby Restaurant
254 Bleecker Street
Mecca for cheeses, breads, olives

Beecher’s Handmade Cheese
900 Broadway
Variety of cheeses and small sharable plates

Alleva Dairy
188 Grand Street
Currently owned by Tony Danza, historic Italian goods store, opened over 100 years

Stonewall Inn 
53 Christopher Street
Historical Landmark for the gay rights movement

Haven Rooftop 
132 West 47th Street
Cabanas in a glassed in rooftop bar serving cocktails and French cuisine bites

Donahue’s Steak House
845 Lexington Avenue
Vintage establishment serving quality steaks

Clocktower NYC
5 Madison Avenue
Brunch in a club setting with dining rooms and pool table

Rainbow Room
30 Rockefeller Plaza, 65th Floor
Iconic; Drinks, or if Brunch begins again

Campbell Apartment
Grand Central Station - 15 Vanderbilt Avenue
Classic cocktails & light fare in the ornate Grand Central offices of a 1920's mogul

Boucherie
225 Park Avenue South  or 99 7th Avenue South
French cuisine 

Taureau
558 Broome Street
Fondue

Black Tap
136 West 55th Street
Burgers and creatively massive ice-cram shakes

The Plaza at The Palm Court RestaurantFifth Avenue at Central Park SouthClassic piece of NYC history

Lombardi’s
32 Spring Street
America’s first pizzeria

John’s Pizzeria of Bleecker Street
278 Bleecker Street
Historic pizzeria
Brooklyn
 Clinton Hall
247 Metropolitan Avenue
Fondue burger

Bamonte’s
32 Withers Street
Open since the 1950s, known for gigantic raviolis and lasagna with chicken and spinach

Embers Steakhouse 
9519 3rd Avenue
Open since 1985, uses Vinnie’s Butcher Shop right next door

Hometown Barbecue
454 Van Brunt Street
Pulled pork, ribs

The Osprey
60 Furman Street/ 1 Brooklyn Bridge HotelChicken salad sandwich

Smorgasburg
Well House Drive, Prospect Park
Outdoor food market
Bronx
Jake’s Steak House
6031 Broadway
Steakhouse with a view of Cortlandt Park
Outerboroughs
Sally Pizza
237 Wooster Avenue New Haven, CT 06511
A New Haven tradition since 1938

Coney Island Pizza
40 Hamburg Turnpike Riverdale, NJ 07457
Cooked on a wood burning oven

Bar Apizza
254 Crown Street   New Haven, CT 06511
Mashed potato and bacon pie
New 
Borough
Restaurant
Location
Reason
Manhattan
Prince Street Pizza
27 Prince Street
Iconic NYC pizzeria

Joe’s Pizza
7 Carmine Street
Operated by Joe himself since 1975

La Rossa
267 Lafayette
Cacio y pepe pizza

Pizza Quadrata Romana (PQR)
1631 Second Avenue at 85th Street
Sicilian slice 

Lions & Tigers & Squares
268 West 23rd Street 
Detroit style pizza

Pizza Rollio
261 West 18th Street
Thin, crispy pizza you can roll up. Try Nemo’s Choice

Loring Place
21 West 8th Street at Washington Square West
Grandma slice bigger than most and only sold by the pie

Violet 
511 5th Street between Avenues A & B
Chef Matt Hyland of “Emmy’s Squared”

Hunt & Fish Club NYC
126 West 44th Street between Broadway and 6th Avenue
Best steaks in NYC

Caked Up Cafe
40 South Main Street
Truly original cupcake flavors like pizza

Snow Days
241 East 10th Street 
Shaved ice cream

Hearth
403 East 12th Street at 1st Avenue
Chef Alex Guarnaschelli’s favorite gnocchi 

Pasta Lovers
142 West 49th Street 
Penne a la vodka with mozzarella 
Brooklyn
Williamsburg Cafe & Roastery 
125 North 6th Street
Flagship cafe & brew school

Hungry Ghost Coffee
253 Flatbush Avenue
Known for their latte art

Llama Inn
50 Withers Street 
Burnt meringue lime pie - Best Thing I Ever Ate

Choice Market
318 Lafayette Avenue
Chef Ted Allen’s favorite BLT

Morgan’s Brooklyn Barbecue
267 Flatbush Avenue
Brisket nachos, smoked steak

Lowerline Po’Boys
794 Washington Avenue at Sterling Place
New Orleans inspired cuisine 

Tony Luke’s
6 Flatbush Avenue
Philadelphia cheesesteak legend

Dos Torros
189 Bedford Avenue
Mexican food created by two brothers from California

The Wheelhouse
165 Wilson Avenue 
Gourmet grilled cheese sandwiches

Speedy Romeo
376 Classon Avenue 
St. Louis inspired pizza: drier, thinner, crisper. Try pizza named for the city.

Dellarocco’s
214 Hicks Street
Makes over 14 versions of a white pie

Giuseppina’s
691 6th Avenue
Same owners as Lucali’s

Gristmill
289 5th Avenue 
Wood fired pies with usual toppings

L & B Spumoni Gardens
2725 86th Street
A Brooklyn institution known for Sicilian slice

Williamsburg Pizza
265 Union Avenue
Grandma slice

Screamer’s Pizza
685 Franklin Avenue 
Fried chicken and waffle fries pizza (Crown Heights location only)
Bronx
Sal & Dom’s
1108 Allerton Avenue
Bakery open since 1956

Terranova Bakery
691 East 187th Street 
Best pizza and bread on Arthur Avenue

Cafe Almercato
2344 Arthur Avenue
Potato pizza
Queens
Freddy’s Pizzeria
1266 150th Street 
Part of inspiration for Paulie Gee’s “Freddy Prince” slice
Outerboroughs
Willington Pizza House
25 River Road, Route 32 Willington, CT 06279
Red potato pizza that is nationally award winning

Sarcone’s Bakery
758 South 9th Street Philadelphia, PA 19147
5th Generation Bakery known for their red sauce pizza

Old Town Coffee 
221 Church Street
Philadelphia, PA 19106
Coffee and snacks

The Bagel Nook
51 Village Center Drive Freehold, NJ 07728
Cool ranch Dorrito bagels 

Brother’s Bruno
200 Hamburg Turnpike Wayne, NJ 07470
Pizza, deli, bagels since 1976

White Manna
358 River Street Hackensack, NJ 07601
Chef Michael Symon’s favorite sliders

Maria’s Pastry Shop
167 Post Avenue Westbury, NY 11590
Lobster tails

All American Drive-In
4286 Merrick Road Massapequa, NY 11758
Hot dog and hamburger stand operated since 1963



2019/2020 To Do List; Activities
Remaining From Prior Year
Borough
Activities
Location
Reason
Manhattan
Morris Jumel Mansion
65 Jumel Terrace
Oldest house in borough

Cathedral of St. John the Divine
1047 Amsterdam Avenue
Fifth largest church in the U.S. 

City Hall Park Monuments
City Hall
Memorials for Jane Addams, Horace Greenly, Crime Victims, Declaration of Independence, Freedom Tree Marker, Joseph Pulitzer, Liberty Flagstaff, LT. Issac Barre, Underground Railway, Provost Prison

Gracie Mansion
East End Avenue at 88th Street 
Mayor’s home

Belvedere Castle
79th Street, Central Park
Dates to 1919 with exhibit rooms, observation deck
Brooklyn
Lefferts Historic House
452 Flatbush Avenue, Prospect Park
Built in 1783 showcases life of Brooklyn families in the 1820s

Brooklyn Navy Yard 
63 Flushing Avenue 
Tour describing WWII effort and other uses for the facility
Bronx
Woodlawn Cemetery
517 East 233rd Street
Rosa Parks, FW Woolworth, Irving Berlin, Elizabeth Lady Stanton, Nellie Bly, Joseph Pulitzer, Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney 
Outerboroughs
Ferncliff Cemetery
280 Secor Road, Hartsdale NY 10530
Joan Crawford, Tom Carvel, John Lennon, Jim Henson

Old Westbury Gardens
71 Old Westbury Road Westbury, NY 11590
Gold Coast Mansion

Boldt Castle
1 Heart Island Alexandria Bay, NY 13607
“If you haven’t seen Boldt Castle lately you haven't seen Boldt Caste”

Jay Heritage Center
210  Boston Road Rye, NY 10580
John Jay, first Chief Justice, Ancestor’s Home

VanCortlandt Manor
525 South Riverside Avenue Croton On Hudson, NY 10520
Historical Landmark
New 
Borough
Activities
Location
Reason
Manhattan
Come From Away (play)
Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre- 236 West 45th Street
True story of those on planes forced to land wherever was closest on 9/11/01

Merchant’s House Museum
29 East 4th Street 
Manhattan’s first landmark, house dates back to the early 19th century
Brooklyn
Lott House
1940 East 36th Street
One of the oldest farmhouses in the area, former stop on the Underground Railroad
Bronx
Edgar Allan Poe Cottage
Poe Park- 2640 Grand Concourse at East Kingsbridge Road
Author lived here from 1844 until his death
Queens
Addisleigh Park
Various addresses 
Former homes of famous people such as: Jackie Robinson, Etta James, James Brown, LL Cool J

Bowne House
37-01 Bowne Street
Oldest house in Queens circa 1661
Staten Island
Historic Richmond Town
441 Clarke Avenue
Living history village telling 300 hundred years of history

Conference House
7455 Hylan Blvd
Site of the 1776 Peace Conference
Outboroughs
Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Park
25 West End Avenue Oyster Bay, NY 11771
TR: “"I wish that we citizens of Oyster Bay could make here a breathing place for all the people of this neighborhood especially the less fortunate ones.”

Raynham Hall Museum
20 W Main Street Oyster Bay, NY 11771
On my 2015 to do list, former home of the Townsend family who acted as spies for George Washington

Katonah
TBD
Town in NY near John Jay Homestead where 55 Victorian homes  and buildings were moved by horse in the early 19th century

Lucy The Elephant
9200 Atlantic Avenue
Margate, NJ 08402
A former hotel, and only survivor of 3 originals created in 1800s. 

Stepping Stones  
62 Oak Road    Katonah, NY 10536
Former home of Bill and LoIs Wilson who created AAA and Al-Anon

Tri-States Monument aka  Tri-State Rock  
This site is accessed via the road located within Laurel Grove Cemetery in Port Jervis, NY.
This Monument was placed in 1882, and serves as the marker between NY, NJ, and PA

Top Cottage
4097 Albany Road  Hyde Park, NY 12538
A cabin on the sight of FDR’s estate, built after his 2nd term in office

Martin Van Buren Historical Site
1013 Old Post Road Kinderhook, NY 12106
The 8th President’s former home 

Lindenwald
1013 Old Post Road Kinderhook, NY 12106
President Van Buren’s home post presidency 

Kinderhook Reformed Church Cemetery
21 Broad Street Kinderhook, NY 12106
Where the 8th President is buried


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